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Congressional Record: Additional Statements

History and Use of the Congressional Record: Proceedings and Debates of Congress.

How Can You Deliver a Speech After You're Dead?

Hale Boggs of Louisiana addressed the House of Representatives on October 18, 1972. However, on October 16, the plane in which he was flying crashed and all on board were assumed dead.

Boggs's extensive speech had been submitted before he left and was inserted into the Record.

In 1978 Congress enacted reforms, including putting a bullet before and after inserted remarks. The House later changed this practice to printing inserted text in a different typeface (sans serif).

Did He/she Say That?

Many statements in the Congressional Record were never said on the floor.

Extensions of Remarks

The House of Representatives uses this separate section to print extended remarks. The section includes:

additional legislative statements not actually delivered on the House floor, as well as extraneous material, such as texts of speeches delivered outside Congress, letters from and tributes to constituents and newspaper or magazine articles.

from "About the Congressional Record."

Order to be printed

While speaking on the floor, a Member of Congress can request that material be added.

Wording to this effect is used: I request unanimous consent that it printed in the Record.

The proceedings show: There being no objection, the material was ordered to be printed in the Record, as follows.

Appended or Inserted

Each house allows for remarks to be added to the proceedings. Each house has created a visual way for readers to know this. These statements appear at the bottom of the first page of the proceedings of the respective house.

House

Senate

Note: these visual markers were not added until 1978. Prior to that, there was no way to distinquish what was said and what was added.

Additional Statements: Senate - Order To Be Printed

Congressional Record, September 30, 1999. Senate (145 Cong. Rec. S11670)

Additional Statements: Senate

Congressional Record, January 26, 1999, p. S1015 (145 Cong. Rec. S1015).

The bullets at the beginning and ending of the remarks indicate that Mr. CLELAND did not speak these words on the Senate floor.

This statement and others are under a heading called "Additional Statements, but the heading is not above each statement.

 

Additional Statements: House

The House uses a sans serif typeface for matter not spoken on the floor.

 

 

Congressional Record, January 26, 2010, pages H336 and H337. (156 Cong. Rec. H336)

Mr. SKELTON spoke these words on the floor of the House

but not these.

Additional Statements: Senate: in ProQuest Congressional

Congressional Record, January 26, 1999, p. S1015 (145 Cong. Rec. S1015); as displayed in Congressional Publications (ProQuest) database. There are no bullets to identify words not spoken on the floor. 

 

Additional Statements: House: In ProQuest Congressional

Congressional Record, January 26, 2010, pages H336 and H337; Tribute to Our Remarkable Troops (156 Cong. Rec. H336); as displayed in Congressional Publications (ProQuest) database. There is no typeface distinction to identify words not spoken on the floor.

 

Subject Guide

Rebecca Knight's picture
Rebecca Knight
Contact:
Associate librarian
Reference and Instructional Services Department
Morris Library, Room 117H
(302) 831-1730


Subjects: U.S. Government Information,
Delaware, census, family studies, RefWorks, APA style, and genealogy.


Education:
B.A., History. University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. 1973.
M.S., Library Science. University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. 1981.

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