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Constitution Day 2014: Words of Liberty   Tags: constitution, federal depository library, for kids, liberty  

Constitution Day is September 17
Last Updated: Jul 28, 2014 URL: http://guides.lib.udel.edu/constitutionday Print Guide RSS Updates

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The Constitution Comes in a Pocket Size!

The Constitution is a very important document, but it can literally fit in your pocket.

 

Constitution Day Resources from the University of Delaware Library

 

Pocket Constitutions

 

When is Constitution Day?

Constitution Day is September 17

How Did Constitution Day Begin?

  • I Am An American Day (legislation 1940)
    Third Sunday in May
    In 1940, Congress passed a joint resolution requesting the President to issue a proclamation each year, setting aside the third Sunday in May for the public recognition of all who had attained the status of American citizenship. The day to be called I Am An American Day.

    Printed in Statutes at Large. Chapter 183, 54 Stat. 178, May 3, 1940.
  • I Am An American Day Proclamation (1940)
    President Franklin D. Roosevelt proclaimed the first I Am An American Day to be May 19, 1940.

    Printed in the Code of Federal Regulations, Proclamation 2402, May 3, 1940. 3 C.F.R. 156 (1938-1943).
  • Citizenship Day (legislation 1952)
    September 17
    Joint Resolution of Congress designating September 17 of each year as “Citizenship Day."

    "...in commemoration of the formation and signing September 17, 1787, of the Constitution of the United States and in recognition of all who, by coming of age or by naturalization, have attained the full status of citizenship...

    Printed in Statutes at Large. Chapter 49, 66 Stat. 9, February 29, 1952.
    Printed in the United States Code. 36 U.S.C. § 106.
  • Citizenship Day Proclamation (1952)
    President Harry S. Truman proclaimed the first Citizenship Day to be September 17, 1952.

    Printed in the Code of Federal Regulations, Proclamation 2984, July 25, 1952, 3 C.F.R. 164 (1947-1953).
  • Constitution Week Proclamation (1955)
    President Dwight D. Eisenhower proclaimed September 17 through September 23, 1955 to be the first Constitution Week (in accordance to Senate Concurrent Resolution 40 (July 26, 1955).

    Printed in the Code of Federal Regulations, Proclamation 3109, August 19, 1955, 3 C.F.R. 56 (1954-1958).
  • Constitution Week (legislation 1956)
    Joint resolution of Congress, requesting the President proclaim the week September 17 to September 23 as Constitution Week.

    Printed in the United States Code. August 2, 1956, 36 U.S.C. §108
  • S. 2808: Celebrate the United States Constitution Day Act (bill 2004)
    Bill sponsored by Senator Robert Byrd. S. 2808 — 108th Congress (2003-2004). This bill was not passed.
    Senator Byrd's speech, pdf September 20, 2004, in the Congressional Record when he introduced the bill. (150 Cong. Rec. S9371)
  • Constitution Day and Citizenship Day (legislation 2004)  Icon
    An amendment to the omnibus appropriations act; sponsored by Senator Robert Byrd (West Virginia). Requires all federal employees and all students at schools receiving federal funds to receive education and training about the Constitution on September 17.

    Printed in Statutes at Large. Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2005, Public Law 108-447, 118 Stat. 2809, Div. J, Title I, Section 111, Dec. 8, 2004.
    Printed in the United States Code. 36 USC § 106

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– James Madison, "Letter to W. T. Barry" (August 4, 1822)

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