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Open Educational Resources

Open Educational Resources (OER) educational materials produced by educators that are licensed to be shared freely and at no cost to others.  OER may include question banks, syllabi, games, simulations, tutorials, lesson plans, full textbooks and even full courses.

Image courtesy of OpenSource.com CC BY-SA 2.0

YouTube Video on How to Create Learning Materials with Different Licenses

Found on the Orange Grove Repository's YouTube channelThe Orange Grove repository is Florida's digital repository for instructional resources.

This video is intended to help you choose compatible resources and choose a valid license for your work. Suppose you are developing an open educational resource (OER), and you want to use some other OER within yours. If you create a derivative work by adapting or combining works offered under Creative Common licenses, you must not only follow the terms of each of the licenses involved, but also choose a license for your work that is compatible with the other licenses.

Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/b... ), Copyright Florida Virtual Campus

OER basics

Creative Commons

Creative Commons is a non-profit that offers an alternative to full copyright.  creativecommons.org

Briefly...

Attribution icon Attribution means:
You let others copy, distribute, display, and perform your copyrighted work - and derivative works based upon it - but only if they give you credit.

Noncommercial icon Noncommercial means:
You let others copy, distribute, display, and perform your work - and derivative works based upon it - but for noncommercial purposes only.

No Derivative Works icon No Derivative Works means:
You let others copy, distribute, display, and perform only verbatim copies of your work, not derivative works based upon it.

Share Alike iconShare Alike means:
You allow others to distribute derivative works only under a license identical to the license that governs your work.